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  Colonel (Ret) Paul Palmer commanded the 2/14 ACR from 1966 through 1968 and has provided great assistance to the web site through text and photos that recall the cavalry in Bad Kissingen prior to the re-flag of the Regiment in 1972. In his own words:

The Building of Camp Wollbach

"I had the honor of taking command of the 2/14 ACR in July 1966. Prior to this, I was working on a major staff study at Heidelberg and I came to know the VII Commander, LTG Mildren.  As I got ready to move to Bad Kissingen, he told me, Ď If you ever need any help let me know and Iíll see what I can do ...í

         
 

   
  Entrance to the border camp as of 1968. Much work had been done, other improvements took place over time.
--Gene Meder
  Newly built Border Ops Center in Winter of 1967
--Richard Harrington
 
         

Among my first priorities upon taking command was to review our border surveillance mission and the border camp. Configured as a "tent city", Camp  Wollbach was similar to any forward camp found on the ranges and MTAís in Germany.  Conditions were Spartan but acceptable.  I felt, however, that perhaps we could do better and began to investigate what improvements could be made.  At Daley Barracks, as both the squadron commander and post commander, I had some freedom of action and Lieutenant General Mildren pledged his support in getting a more substantial  camp built.

         
     
  Family day at the camp , a good chance to show off what we had built.
--Richard Harrington
  Here is the new Day Room in late 1967, named to honor the man who really helped us get the project moving, LTG Frank T. Mildren.
--Paul Palmer
 
         

The German Facilities Engineers were able to do a site survey and determine how to bring in additional electricity, water and a septic system to support an expanded and improved camp. Good fortune smiles on the bold and, at the time, France had just pulled out of NATO and the US forces in that country were departing. We were able to identify and rapidly procure from a depot,  the Quonset Huts and other "tin" buildings that had been removed from France and with General Meldrenís assistance, get them moved and placed at the Wollbach. Other smaller buildings were built on site and after three or four months, things were really beginning to take on a professional look. Before the end of 1966, all of our border troops were out of tents and the camp was essentially complete. Troopers from the squadron put in a lot of labor in addition to all the other duty requirements and I was proud of their efforts. As a way of acknowledging the great help of LTG Meldren, the newly built Day Room was named in his honor complete with a sign."

         
     
  Side view of Mildren Hall.
--Paul Palmer
  Interior view of the new Day Room.
--Paul Palmer
 
         

Follow Up

Through the years, many additional improvements occurred at Camp Wollbach / Lee. The pre-fab buildings were added in the early 1970ís taking the place of the barracks style Quonset Huts and as time and budgets allowed, further camp improvements occurred. The sign on the Day Room - in use as the Camp Beer Hall, lasted at least until 1978, the building itself was replaced in the major camp upgrade in 1985. The camp has recently been sold to a group of German investors who are exploring the idea of turning the site into a Cold War theme museum. Remaining on site, however, are at least two buildings from the first construction activities of 1966, the former arms room and the metal building initially used as an Orderly Room, then reconfigured to the Camp Lee Day Room then finally as the Learning Center.

         
     
  ... and here is the interior view in the opposite direction.
--Paul Palmer
  Here I am surrounded by the men who really did the heavy lifting to get the camp finished, the soldiers of the 2/14 ACR to include Sergeant Major Jefferies at far right.
--Paul Palmer
 
     
  "Frank T. Mildren Hall" in use as the camp Beer Hall in 1978
--Bob Stefanowicz
  Quonset Hut buildings being assembled at the border camp in 1966. These became our barracks; we finally got rid of the tents.  
         
         

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